1. Coordinating conjunctions: These conjunctions join words, phrases, or clauses that are equal or similar in structure. Coordinating conjunctions include words such as "and," "or," "but," "for," "nor," "yet," and "so."

Subordinating conjunctions: These conjunctions join a subordinate clause to a main clause.  

Correlative conjunctions: These conjunctions work in pairs to join words, phrases, or clauses that are equal or similar in structure.  

Correlative conjunctions include pairs such as "both...and," "either...or," "neither...nor," "not only...but also," and "whether...or." 

Subordinating conjunctions include words such as "after," "although," "because," "if," "since," "that," "though," "until," "when," and "while." 

Coordinating conjunctions include words such as "and," "or," "but," "for," "nor," "yet," and "so." 

A conjunction is a word that connects words, phrases, or clauses in a sentence. Conjunctions are used to coordinate or join words, phrases, or clauses together. 

"I went to the store, but they were closed." (The coordinating conjunction "but" joins the two clauses "I went to the store" and "they were closed.") 

Conjunctions are important because they help us connect and clarify the relationship between different ideas in a sentence. 

They help us create clear and logical connections between words, phrases, and clauses,  

making our writing and speaking more coherent and cohesive. 

Conjunctions are important because they help us connect and clarify the relationship between different ideas in a sentence.